Resources and tips for the self-published author.

Publishing News Roundup Series: Ordinary Independent Authors Vs. Professional Independent Authors

by Maureen Crisp •  July 18, 2016  •   Follow

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What is the difference between indie authors and ‘professional’ indie authors?

Is there a difference, and how can we define this difference? The Alliance of Independent Authors has created a distinct telling mark for readers and other authors to know the difference with. Reading that just might help people to make themselves the professional indie authors they want to be. In other writing challenges this week, Kris Rusch wrote a post on contract dealbreakers to help authors figure out how to protect their rights under a writing contract with a traditional publisher:


Classic Writing Challenges


This week there has been a lot of discussion on The Alliance of Independent authors (Alli) making a distinction between ordinary independent authors and ‘professional’ independent authors. Publishing Perspectives takes a look at what Alli are trying to do… Because we are all professional aren’t we?
Kris Rusch has another stand out post on Contract Dealbreakers… This week it’s Rights Reversion. This is an important post to read especially if you are looking at a contract where the publisher wants all
rights… or no dice. (this is common in NZ.)
A few weeks ago I had a link to a post by Steven Spohn on Chucks Blog, on the nature of writing disabled characters. This week, Disability in Kids Lit, posted an article of terms to be familiar with if you are writing a disabled character.
This week Mike Shatzkin announced that he will no longer be programming the Digital Book World Conference as he thinks the big strategic questions facing the book industry have been answered. Mike shares an overview of the last decade. And what a decade it has been.
Writer Unboxed has an excellent article on dealing with Writers Block… In a choose your own adventure style.
Hugh Howey writes an excellent story. This week on his blog he talks about breaking ideas. Not just breaking but shattering them to find an unforgettable idea… and writing from there.  It just might be a new classic.
In the Craft Section,
Nailing Internal Dialogue– Jane Friedman Bookmark

Three steps to a smoother writing style– Roz Morris – Bookmark

Two Bookmark posts by Janice Hardy, Creating unlikeable but compelling villains and False Starts.

Desire is the driving force– Michael Hauge- Bookmark
In the Marketing Section,
10 tips for how to get Book Reviewers– Anne R Allen Bookmark

5 steps for the killer book talk- Jane Friedman Bookmark

Optimal success in book pricing– Digital Book World

Before you self publish read this– Joanna Penn – Bookmark

Canva newbie guide– (Excellent overview of this tool)
To Finish,
Today there was a spirited opinion piece in the Guardian taking issue with the tired old list of books being foisted on children as classics. The list came from the BBC’s Love to read campaign and was
contributed to by the public. But modern children’s literature was missing. We know it’s being bought so why doesn’t it make these classic lists?
A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness is being made into a film. This book has won numerous awards and is the only book to win both The Carnegie (Patrick Ness for writing) and the Greenaway Medal (Jim Kay for illustration) It is absolutely a modern classic. Do we have to wait for a film to be made to validate this? (Trailer out today.)



About Maureen Crisp

Maureen Crisp has been writing her weekly publishing roundups for over seven years. She is a traditionally published children's author as well as indie-published. She lives in New Zealand and is heading the team organising the 4th National Conference of Children's Writers and Illustrators. She is currently trying her hand at writing a children’s book series if she can drag herself away from forever tweaking her Mars novel or obsessing over space.