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Publishing News Roundup Story: How Much Do Readers Influence What Author’s Write?

by Maureen Crisp •  February 15, 2019  •   Follow

Published in News  •  No comments

What content is in your book can affect how readers perceive you and your writing.

But should their judgement decide what you write? This is a difficult question. An author writes for its readers and ultimately they are the ones supporting the authors ability to write. But how much does an author want to please them, while still being able to express them self?

 

Whose Attitude Is Right?

Pic : Flickr Creative Commons Guilhem Vellut
Around the publishing blogosphere…
 
This week was unsettling on Social Media. First there was the big Twitter pile on
Amelie was about to publish her debut novel. As authors do, she drew on her upbringing
and culture from her own country. She has a 3 book deal with a traditional publisher in the USA.
From what I could see as the Twitter rage grew… many commenting had not read advance copies so did not know the context but raged about it anyway. Many immediately took the author to task for seeming to use American historical events badly in her fantasy.
For writers from other countries watching this rage fest unfold on Twitter it was deeply unsettling. The rest of the world has stories to tell of slavery, human trafficking happening now or in the past. Other cultures experiences of this is just as valid to use as a basis for a fantasy book. Do we always have to use and be mindful of the same western viewpoints in an age where stories are shared globally with the click of a button?



While writers and commentators were getting steamed up over a fantasy book,
publishers and agents were getting spooked by the story broken in
all his credentials on a fantasy life. As the events in his fantasy life were exposed
it read like the famous novel The Talented Mr Ripley. The writer/editor had relationships
everywhere and there will be many people in publishing feeling they have been
the townspeople in The Emperor’s New Clothes.



Another big story this week was the subscription service
Scribd passing 1 million subscribers. Publishers have been flirting with subscription
services for a while. Amazon has what could be the world’s biggest with Kindle Unlimited
based mainly in the USA but that leaves Scribd with the rest of the world…



Another publisher with global ambitions has just opened publishing portals in another
21 countries over 6 continents.
If you are a writer in Lesotho or Nandi, writing in your own language…
Streetlib is for you. Among the new countries just enrolled in their publishing
portal are Fiji, Australia and New Zealand.    



Amazon is looking at the rest of the world and thinking hmm great kids books in
other languages- they need us. They are opening up their Amazon kids publishing
Meanwhile Google is contracting- with Google Plus set to disappear by April.
 
And so we come to Kris Rusch’s last blog post looking at the changes for publishing this year.
It has been an fascinating series. If you haven’t been reading her posts you are missing out
on learning about this industry. Last week’s post is a must read!



In The Craft Section,
 
5 ways to turn off your inner editor – Janice Hardy- Bookmark
 
 
 



In The Marketing Section,

3 principles of selling rights– Orna Ross- Bookmark
 
Discoverability and Going Wide– The Book Designer
 
 
How can I get more subscribers– Indies Unlimited
 
 
Smart author advertising strategies – Penny Sansevieri – Bookmark




To Finish,
We are living through major changes in our climate and our perceptions

and understandings of our place in a global village.
The internet has opened up the democratisation of information across the world.
For the author having an online presence is essential. Careful curation
of your digital presence is important.
Remember that gossip is not restricted to your own village now,
it can spread throughout the world with a click of a button.



Maureen
@craicer

About Maureen Crisp

Maureen Crisp has been writing her weekly publishing roundups for over seven years. She is a traditionally published children's author as well as indie-published. She lives in New Zealand and is heading the team organising the 4th National Conference of Children's Writers and Illustrators. She is currently trying her hand at writing a children’s book series if she can drag herself away from forever tweaking her Mars novel or obsessing over space.